Creative fingering

So I’ve come up against my first instance of annoyance with a written fingering in “Angels We Have Heard On High” that both requires me to hold my hand in a grossly uncomfortable way and run a 100% chance of buzzing multiple times. I cheat my way out of it multiple times with three 4-note-long 2nd finger slides, and I refuse to apologize for it because it’s rock solid and has zero risk of buzzing. 🙂 I’d like to do this the “right way,” but there are limits to my ability to ignore my better judgment, even if I’m not qualified to have any.

I suppose I’ll pick up Betty Paret’s book, something meant for instruction as opposed to something that is not really a teaching tool. That way, when an annoying fingering is presented to me, I should be able to work out why I’m being directed to do it like that. Right now, all I can think of is, “Easier, faster, more flexible, less risky.”

More arpeggios and scales tomorrow morning.

Update: Indeed more arpeggios, no scales though. And I forgot to note that I used an idea from the latest of Josh Layne’s videos on YouTube as well, the first part of his look at the Haendel harp concerto. I had been having trouble going from a 3-2-1 D Major to a 4-2-1 G Major in third inversion because of the back of my 2nd finger buzzing against the still ringing F#. Layne mentioned having some similar trouble and that he had dealt with the problem not by avoiding having his finger bump against that string, but by doing it deliberately and firmly, and effectively muffling the ringing string with the back of his knuckle to neutralize the problem it presented. Sure enough, it works like a charm, and now I can play that G Major with the more secure and comfortable 3-2-1, just like the chord before it — which particularly helps since the 3 is already right next to the D string.

I still do the 4-note slides, though. I’m not stupid. 🙂 The only thing I need to do is remember to keep my thumb up while I do them so my hand is still in good shape to do normal stuff.

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